Keep Swimming

Graduated art major, livin' life in the real world. Art. Architecture. Babies of all species. Funnies. Stuffs. Happy Tumblin'. :)

The 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Red Carpet (August 25, 2014)

(Source: stanakaticland, via can-we-get-much-higher)

lambhoof:

i have a special folder for photos of small dogs snoozing on large sleeping places

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

ethiopienne:

summertime grilled bread, four ways
reclaimingthelatinatag:

The above picture is of my mother. (I posted a selfie during the last time we bombed the Latina tag.) I wanted to write about her because she’s someone whose example I strive to follow.
My mother was born to a middle class family in Mexico City. She is the oldest of six children, and the only member of her immediate family to come to the United States. She left Mexico in January 1981, on a tourist visa, and lived in San Francisco for a while. She could read well in English, but was terrified of speaking it because she had no experience doing so. Despite this, she enrolled in UC Berkeley later that year, at which point she was able to turn her tourist visa into a student visa.
At Berkeley, where she would eventually get a Master’s degree in mathematics, she met my father, a white, Jewish American studying physics. When he completed his doctoral degree, he got a job in New York, and she followed him there in 1984. They got married in 1985, and their first child (me) was born in 1987, followed by my brother in 1990. During this time, my mother also got a Master’s degree in Spanish Literature at Columbia University.
What I admire most about my mother, however, is not her obvious intelligence but her compassion and dedication to helping others. She is very aware that many of her fellow Latinxs do not have the opportunities she did, and she does everything she can to help them. Currently, she works at a local middle and high school, where she helps recently arrived Latinx children. In addition to working with them all week, she offers the more dedicated students hours of free tutoring during the weekends.
She has helped some students for years; I have even gotten to know a lot of them through her, as I sometimes help out when they get stuck on a problem. Recently, one of the students she worked with throughout all of said student’s years in high school got accepted to Cornell University. This is my mother’s dream for all of her students! She loves them all so much and goes above and beyond to help them.
My mother could have a higher paying job with her background, but this is what she does because she feels it is her duty to help those less privileged than herself. I really admire that and hope that I can do the same. She told me, once, that growing up in Mexico City made her acutely aware of how fortunate she was due to the contrast between families like hers and the many people and families making do with practically nothing.
The contrast isn’t as dramatic here. Unfortunately, however, many Latinxs, especially the children who are arriving now, do struggle a lot. My mother does everything she can to help them adjust and succeed academically. It can be an overwhelming and, on occasion, frustrating task, but seeing some of them do well makes it all worthwhile for her. My mother is an amazing woman, and I hope that one day I, too, can have the sort of impact on my students that she has on hers.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

The above picture is of my mother. (I posted a selfie during the last time we bombed the Latina tag.) I wanted to write about her because she’s someone whose example I strive to follow.

My mother was born to a middle class family in Mexico City. She is the oldest of six children, and the only member of her immediate family to come to the United States. She left Mexico in January 1981, on a tourist visa, and lived in San Francisco for a while. She could read well in English, but was terrified of speaking it because she had no experience doing so. Despite this, she enrolled in UC Berkeley later that year, at which point she was able to turn her tourist visa into a student visa.

At Berkeley, where she would eventually get a Master’s degree in mathematics, she met my father, a white, Jewish American studying physics. When he completed his doctoral degree, he got a job in New York, and she followed him there in 1984. They got married in 1985, and their first child (me) was born in 1987, followed by my brother in 1990. During this time, my mother also got a Master’s degree in Spanish Literature at Columbia University.

What I admire most about my mother, however, is not her obvious intelligence but her compassion and dedication to helping others. She is very aware that many of her fellow Latinxs do not have the opportunities she did, and she does everything she can to help them. Currently, she works at a local middle and high school, where she helps recently arrived Latinx children. In addition to working with them all week, she offers the more dedicated students hours of free tutoring during the weekends.

She has helped some students for years; I have even gotten to know a lot of them through her, as I sometimes help out when they get stuck on a problem. Recently, one of the students she worked with throughout all of said student’s years in high school got accepted to Cornell University. This is my mother’s dream for all of her students! She loves them all so much and goes above and beyond to help them.

My mother could have a higher paying job with her background, but this is what she does because she feels it is her duty to help those less privileged than herself. I really admire that and hope that I can do the same. She told me, once, that growing up in Mexico City made her acutely aware of how fortunate she was due to the contrast between families like hers and the many people and families making do with practically nothing.

The contrast isn’t as dramatic here. Unfortunately, however, many Latinxs, especially the children who are arriving now, do struggle a lot. My mother does everything she can to help them adjust and succeed academically. It can be an overwhelming and, on occasion, frustrating task, but seeing some of them do well makes it all worthwhile for her. My mother is an amazing woman, and I hope that one day I, too, can have the sort of impact on my students that she has on hers.

Some Handy Examples of How Non-Sex Working Feminists Can Aid in Critiquing the Sex Industry

Your women's studies prof:

Class, do you think pornography enables male entitlement?

You:

Well, according to this essay I read by someone who does porn, it doesn't make a lot of sense to just critique it as a piece of media + not a site + product of highly stigmatized labor. So, yes, it does, but that may largely be beside the point of where and how male violence occurs in relation to pornography.

That lady at your local NOW chapter:

It is WRONG for men to purchase sex, therefore we must make it illegal.

You:

I agree that capitalist conditions create coercive and abusive situations for those in the sex industry, but carceral solutions don't address that underlying issue.

Your younger sister:

*points at a Maxim magazine cover* Isn't it wrong that there are all these sexualized pictures of women everywhere?

You:

It's wrong that the male gaze is all-pervasive and our idea of the ideal woman is profoundly racist, sizeist, ableist, and cissexist. It's also wrong that these images exist within the context of a violent patriarchal culture, but the images themselves are not wrong.

Some rando in your ask box:

How do we end the abuse of people in the sex industries?

You:

Let me link you to this blog by sex workers advocating for workers' rights.

Your boyfriend:

Why is there so much bad sex in porn?

You:

Let me show you this essay on porn by a sex worker.

Your girlfriend:

Stripping is exploitative.

You:

Let me show you this academic article written by a stripper.

Your aunt:

Dominatrices probably think they're empowered but really--

You:

Here's a thing written by a sex worker.

Your grandpa:

Prostitution--

You:

Here's a thing written by a sex worker.

Your cat:

You:

Good point, let me read you this issue of Prose & Lore out loud.

You:

*signal boosts our words + shows up at rallies + emails legislators + gives orgs like Abeni + Sex Workers Project all your damn money*

scottlava:

You guys!  Today is PUBLICATION DAY for my new picture book called HUG MACHINE!!

That is right!  HUG MACHINE is out today in stores all over the place.  This is incredibly exciting for me because this will be the first picture book in which I have both written the words AND drawn the pictures.  An exciting milestone, my friends.

HUG MACHINE is the story of a child who is super down with hugging.  He is the self-proclaimed Hug Machine and he is very excited to tell everyone about it. He is very good at hugging and he is not shy to show the world.  He is ready for you to watch how amazing he is at hugging.

You can read more about this at PyramidCar.com

And if you want to print out activities for you kids that are all about the Hug Machine, you can go to HugMachineBook.com 

(via glowsinthedark9)


Lucy Liu attends the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on August 25, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

Lucy Liu attends the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on August 25, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

(Source: alexsdavidturner, via bamthwok)

mediamattersforamerica:

Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  

Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”

On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 

What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously slut-shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 

If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues. 

(via can-we-get-much-higher)

can-we-get-much-higher:

themightyduckling:

I walked around target like this with my mom for 40 minutes~

itsmonandez
this made me think of you.

haha whoa- flashbacks <3

can-we-get-much-higher:

themightyduckling:

I walked around target like this with my mom for 40 minutes~

itsmonandez
this made me think of you.

haha whoa- flashbacks <3

Dexys Midnight Runners - Come on Eileen

greenmango227:

runnybabbit:

can-we-get-much-higher:

scarymarymusic:

Dexys Midnight Runners - Come on Eileen

I only know one Eileen, and I am pretty sure I know the best Eileen. Love this song. :)

Truer words…

omg my heart you guysssss

i love you Alan. <3 <3

hbcreative:

#FERGUSON

(via kelleykerplunk)

fuckyeahtattoos:

California poppy by James Tran at Full Circle Tattoo, San Diego, CA

fuckyeahtattoos:

California poppy by James Tran at Full Circle Tattoo, San Diego, CA